Southeast Asia

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Map of the partition of India showing the movement of refugees and conflict areas
Wikimedia | CC 4.0

Partition of India (1947)

This month marks 75 years since the division of British India and the subsequent creation of the two separate states of India and Pakistan. British withdrawal prompted the painful divide which was violent and deadly. It forced people to identify with a particular region, and caused the biggest migration event of the century. The concept of ‘martial races’ was born, which led to false ideas of racial purity. Religious violence, insecurity, forced conversions, arson, and sexual violence became rife within communities and even families. Tensions and divisions still exist even today, especially over disputed areas such as Kashmir.

Partition of India (1947)
Huge crowds gather in the centre of Hong Kong all carrying umbrellas
Flickr | Studio Incendo

The Hong Kong National Security Law

On June 30th 2020, this controversial new law was imposed on Hong Kong by the government of China. Many countries have criticised the harsh law which includes severe penalties for protesting, demands for independence, and slandering of the Chinese government. It takes control away from Hong Kong, curtails free speech, and many see it as a loss of idendity.

The Hong Kong National Security Law
Two red and blue North Korea flags flying in the wind on a string with a block of grey buildings in the background
Flickr | (Stephan)

The political restraints in North Korea

As the leader of one of the world’s most repressive states, Kim Jong-Un is enjoying his 8th year of total political control. Freedom of expression, religion, political opposition, independent media, and even trade unions are all restricted. Learn more here about U.S war threats, nuclear weaponry, and much more about this secretive government.

The political restraints in North Korea
Pray for Rohingya mural painted in black on a white crumbling wall - black scooter parked infront
Flickr | Ittmust

Who are the Rohingya and where can they go?

Since 2017, Rohingya Muslims have been persecuted by the Myanmar army. They argue that they are only fighting Rohingya militants, but many see it as a clear example of ethnic cleansing. They are denied citizenship, excluded from the census, and their villages are destroyed. They are forced to make dangerous escape attempts since Bangladesh is no longer accepting refugees across the border.

Who are the Rohingya and where can they go?
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